Design Museum Review

IMG_3695

It was a fine morning when my colleagues and I visited the Design Museum in Kensington. The weather was just right for a stroll in the garden after completing our own tour of the vast and innovative building. What first caught my eye was its contemporary architecture. I have always been influenced by modern and minimalist building designs. John Pawson, the architect of this masterpiece has outdone himself. Once you enter, it will feel empty. Maybe it is because we arrived at 10:00 am exactly, the opening time of the museum. But later on, you hear the buzz of people around you getting louder. You will start to observe more figures when you look down from the glass railings. It is riveting to see what other people look at in the museum, you know what interests them.

Once you enter, it will feel empty. Maybe it is because we arrived at 10:00 am exactly, the opening time of the museum. But later on, you hear the buzz of people around you getting louder. You will start to observe more figures when you look down from the glass railings. It is riveting to see what other people look at in a museum, you know what interests them.

A few pieces triggered my interest and made me want to know more. And other pieces made my jaw drop! Like the first ever hair dryer! I never thought such object existed till I saw one at the museum.

hairdryer

It was labeled as ‘Hairdryer 1.0’ and was produced in Eindhoven, The Netherlands. The materials it was made of was glass, cork, PLA, and bentwood. Kees Berende made the glass body. The filter and joint piece were made at the Eindhoven FabLab. This is interesting – the electric components were found in the local metal junkyard! Fascinating!

Facts:
Labour: 15
Production area: 4.5 km
Price: 100 Euros

The wall of things. It is literally ‘the wall of things’. Random objects that people find to be compelling in a way are stuck on a wall. Here’s how it looks like;

wall

Next to this wall was written, “What does design meant to you?” The museum asked people about the designs that are important to them. They were looking for affordable everyday designs that meant something special. Some of the objects were put there because they held personal memories, some have been chosen for their beauty and others because they do their job well, like the bicycle and an Apple MacBook.

Now, let us look at something smaller. And I mean very small. Something as small as a chip.

human chip-

Above, we have a human chip. As I was looking through the museum, this was the only thing that made me stop and go back to know more. Human organs on chips were designed by Donald Ingber and Dan Dongeun Huh at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, 2010-14.

Harvard Univesity’s Wyss Institute has developed multiple ‘chips’ that model the behavior of human organs. The devices are made from living human cells cultured inside hollow channels shaped like organs. By recreating the performance of natural human organs they help scientists study what happens within the body. The chips open up a possibility of building custom replicas of individual patients’ organs in order to advance personalized medicine. The image above shows human lung on a chip, around 2014.

Saving the best for last. As I have a passion for photography and love to make art out of my images with everything I capture. Here are vintage cameras to look at.

old cameras-

I could name every camera that you see above, but that will be time-consuming. Let me just tell you one thing; the camera is the most magnificent invention of all. And it looks beautiful regardless of color or the company that manufactured it.

Fact: The earliest cameras were specialist pieces owned and used by professionals. When the Box Brownie launched in 1900, Kodak kept the prices low by making on the sale and development of film. A century later Kodak’s business model couldn’t survive the popularity of digital cameras and the company went bankrupt.

 

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